uLearn iPad Accessibility for Educators-Micro MOOC

Conference Proposal, Differentiated Instruction, MAET Year 1, MOOC, P2PU, TPACK, Understanding by Design

uLearn iPad Accessibility for Educators

In my uLearniPad Accessibility for Educators course my peers will master basic iPad Accessibility features by doing hands-on experimentation with each feature and collaboratively creating solutions to common classroom accessibility issues with their peers.

Course Topic:  iPad Accessiblity features for Educators

Course Title & Photo: uLearniPad Accessibility for Educators

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Target Audience: Educators (K-12 and Higher Ed) using iPads in the classroom who have a desire to know or did not even recognize that there are accessibility features for differentiated education on the iPad. Educators will be able to give students access to different features like VoiceOver, AssistiveTouch and Guided Access to make sure that they are using the iPad as a tool to create individualized learning for each student.

What do you want learners to be able to do when they are done?

How long is your course experience?

What will peers make?

How will peers help each other in your course?

Course Learning Goal: Educators using iPads in the classroom will be able to use accessibility features to differentiate learning for all students on the iPad.

Understandings:

  • Learners will understand that there are built in accessibility features in general settings on the iPad and how to use them.
  • Learners will understand that educators are able to use these accessibility features with students to help differentiate instruction for all learners in their classroom.

Essential Questions:

  • How can educators use the iPad to differentiate instruction for all students?
  • How do educators use the iPad to its fullest capabilities as a learning tool in the classroom?

Know & Show:

  • Learners will be able to know and show how to activate, use and personalize the VoiceOver, AssistiveTouch and Guided Access accessibility features on the iPad.
  • Learners will know and show when to appropriately utilize these tools for students in the classroom.

Performance Tasks:

  • At the end of each lesson, students will be presented with a real-world classroom situation and have to collaboratively create a solution to the problem using the iPad accessibility features that they have learned about.

Learning Activities:

Week 1: Vision Accessibility Tools

  • Learn:
    • Watch short screencasts on how to use the Vision accessibility features on the iPad. Read posted resources on how these features can be used in the classroom.
  • Explore:
    • Take a screenshot of a website zoomed in using the Zoom tool and post it to your blog. Reflect on applications of this tool for students in your classroom.
    • Take a screenshot of a note or e-mail that is in large text using the Large Text tool and post it to your blog.
    • Use a screencasting tool to create a screencast of a read aloud of a short book or article using the Speak selection tool. Post this screencast to your blog with a short reflection on applications of this tool for students in your classroom.
  • Create:
    • Performance Task:
      • Situation: A vision-impaired student has entered your classroom. Create a Google Presentation or PowerPoint with two to three other classmates that illustrates and explains three different ways you could use the Vision accessibility tools for differentiation in an actual lesson. Post and share this presentation on your blog.

Week 2: Hearing Accessibility Tools

  • Learn:
    • Watch short screencasts on how to use the Hearing accessibility features on the iPad. Read posted resources on how these features can be used in the classroom.
  • Explore:
    • Plug in earphones and explore how the Mono Audio tool works.
    • Watch a YouTube video with the closed captioning feature.
  • Create:
    • Performance Task:
      • Situation: A hearing impaired student has entered your classroom. Create an interactive slideshow with a three question quiz with a partner using PhotoPeach or Mentor Mob Playlist to present three situations you may encounter and what tools you could use to address them. Post and share this PhotoPeach to your blog.

Week 3: Physical & Motor Accessibility Tools

  • Learn:
    • Watch short screencasts on how to use the Physical & Motor accessibility features on the iPad. Read posted resources on how these features can be used in the classroom.
  • Explore:
    • Turn the AssistiveTouch on and play with it.
    • Create a custom gesture in AssistiveTouch and demonstrate it for us the action and its purpose in a YouTube video. Post it to your blog.
  • Create:
    • Performance Task:
      • Situation: We have to meet the needs of many different kinds of learners in our classroom. With one other classmate, create a HaikuDeck or PowerPoint explaining what kinds of students might benefit from using the AssistiveTouch feature. Post and share this to your blog.

 Week 4: Learning Accessibility Tools

  • Learn:
    • Watch short screencasts on how to use the Learning accessibility features on the iPad. Read posted resources on how these features can be used in the classroom.
  • Explore:
    • Choose an app you would use with your students and use the Guided Access tool to make it the only accessible app. Test it by asking someone to try and access another app on your iPad while this is running. Post a blog entry on how that person reacted and how you may use this tool with your students in your classroom.
  • Create:
    • Performance Task
      • Situation: You have a full class of thirty-two students with iPads with broad needs including ADHD and ASD. Create a collaborative GoogleDoc with two to three other classmates and create a “Top Ten Teacher Strategies for iPad Success” list thinking about how the use of iPad accessibility tools can enhance the learning in your classroom. Post and share to your blog.

Support for this Course

The instructional design for this course was developed using an Understanding by Design unit/lesson template. It is key that the learners are instantly able to make a meaningful connection as to how this course will help them in the real world. For me the Understanding by Design template has been the best way to illustrate that with an “essential question” that tells learners how the content relates in the big picture.

I differentiated the learn and explore (or learning plan) and create (or performance task) sections to each lesson by allowing students to choose the technology they used in their performance task, allowing collaboration with peers, a flexible amount of time to explore each new feature on their own and options to learn about each feature through a multi-modal approach. According to Tomlinson and McTighe (2006), “in tandem, UbD and DI provide structures, tools, and guidance for developing curriculum and instruction based on our current best understandings of teaching and learning.” I believe that Understanding by Design and Differentiated Instruction work really well together to put the focus on the elements of an effective classroom: whom we teach, where we teach, what we teach and how we teach.

For the performance task at the end of each lesson, peers must work collaboratively with a tech tool to create a demonstration of their knowledge to share. It is purposefully designed to be relatively open ended since “the TPACK framework emphasizes the importance of teacher creativity in repurposing technology tools for making them fit pedagogical and disciplinary-learning goals ” (Mishra, 2012, p. 14). The performance task is designed to help educators think not only of the obvious possible ways to use the accessibility features on the iPad but come up with new and creative ways of using them that have not been thought of before.

I feel that the purpose of my course, to inform educators on how to purposefully use iPads for differentiation in the classroom, relates to the TCK part of TPACK as “teachers need to master more than the subject matter they teach; they must also have a deep understanding of the manner in which the subject matter (or the kinds of representations that can be constructed) can be changed by the application of particular technologies”(Koehler & Mishra, 2009). The potential of the accessibility features of the iPad is huge but must be unlocked by the teacher before the tools can be passed on to the students.

References

Koehler, M. J., & Mishra, P. (2009). What is technological pedagogical content knowledge? Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 9(1), 60-70.

McTighe, J. & Tomlinson, C. (2006). Integrating Differentiated Instruction and Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Mishra, P. (2012). Rethinking technology & creativity in the 21st century: Crayons are the future. TechTrends, 56(5), 13-16. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11528-012-0594-0

One thought on “uLearn iPad Accessibility for Educators-Micro MOOC

  1. I think that you stating from the very beginning that this project will be hands on is something that will pull in people right away to your course. I think when learning any sort of technology it is important that it is an active rather than passive learning process. Your course is very well developed and organized and you have provided academic support to further strengthen your argument. Well done.

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